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Idaho governor signs bill making ballot measures tougher

BOISE, Idaho (AP) - Idaho Gov. Brad Little has signed legislation making it more difficult to get initiatives or referendums on ballots in what is widely seen as an attempt to stop a medical marijuana initiative.

The Republican governor announced the decision Saturday to sign into law the measure backers say is needed because the current process favors urban voters.

Opponents say the measure would make it nearly impossible to get initiatives on ballots.

The proposed law would require the signatures of 6% of registered voters in all 35 Idaho districts.

Little vetoed similar legislation in 2019 out of concern a federal court could find it unconstitutional and dictate Idaho’s ballot initiative process.

Idaho / Idaho Politics / Local News / Politics / Top Stories

Associated Press

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2 Comments

  1. As ‘our’ government(s) drop even the PRETENSE of the proles having any say in the machinations of how ‘our’ government(s) rule over us. I will give the last ten or twelve years ONE thing; they have really lessened any fear I ever had about reaching that ‘last’ birthday. 😉

  2. Thank you Gov. This was needed. Too many groups like Reclaim Idaho (a group based out of CA; not Idaho) had determined all it took was large urban areas, primarily liberal and progressive to get a proposal on a ballot. That left out those in areas where collecting signatures is more problematic.

    All this new law does is make is equal in how these signatures are collected. If it makes it a bit harder on these out-of-state, or even in state groups, so be it. Only way it makes it impossible is that they cannot rely ONLY on progressive liberal signatures to get it on the ballot, they now have to get conservative, libertarian areas to add their inputs of signing or not signing.

    What’s so bad with that idea? Except for those who were working the old system.

    Then again, too many people are small minded, or just uneducated and cannot read or understand what a law actually says; new or old.

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